Peggy Kurtin Awards for Excellence in Restoration Past Winners

Every year, the CPA celebrates great work in restoration as it presents the Peggy Kurtin Award for Excellence in Restoration. The Award is named after Peggy Kurtin (1932-2009), a former CPA president who, for many years, was the soul and engine of heritage in Cabbagetown.  

The Award recognizes owners who have completed some significant restoration work to the front of their homes. It celebrates renovations/restorations that enhance the streetscape of our community through an imaginative understanding of the scale, materials, and detailing which contributes to the character our streets. 

Former winners of the Award are:

1993

60 Spruce Street

Renovators: Unknown

Reason for Award
This property won the award for the meticulously restored iron railing along the roofline, lovingly restored wooden shutters, barge board added to the east side of the house and carefully chosen Victorian colours applied to the wooden trim.

Historical Information
Built in 1883, 60 Spruce Street was owned by John B. Hutchinson, a bookkeeper for the Samuel Rogers & Co. oil company. The house was once owned by a judge. Its appeal comes from its Gingerbread trim, ironwork cresting and perennial garden.

1994

85 Winchester Street

Renovators: Ross McGregor and Julie White

Reason for Award
An outstanding renovation of this pre-confederation, Georgian-style home.

Historical Information
Built in 1857, the house was known as the Parson’s House, named after one of the early owners, Charles Parsons, a leather merchant. It was the home of one couple for over 50 years through both World Wars I and II. The Toronto Historical Board designated this house because of its significant Georgian architecture which contrasts attractively with the Victorian architecture of the neighbourhood.

1995

156 Winchester Street

Renovator: Carol Moore-Ede

Reason for Award
Recognized for the replication of the original front porch with copper sheathed roof and Victorian fretwork that matches archival photos of the house.

Historical Information
The Lamb House: Parts of this beautiful house contain the oldest architectural elements in the area, dating to the 1830’s. The façade and fence of the house were designed by Henry Langley who designed many notable Toronto churches. Daniel Lamb took over his father’s factory in 1860, a glue factory located on what is now Wellesley Park and then took over the house and moved in with his bride in 1867 and lived there until his death in 1920. Lamb was responsible for the Riverdale Zoo, the Rosedale Valley Road and the reclaiming of Ashbridges Bay.

1996

485 Sackville Street

Renovators: Blaine Curry and Terry Smith

Reason for Award
This semi-detached house just north of the intersection of Sackville and Wellesley was recognized for the cleaning of the brick, the gaslights, the urn and the mailbox which brought the house to the full glory of its 1890 beginning.

Historical Information
Built in 1889 and first owned by Nathaniel Baldwin, who also owned 483 Sackville, this property was first occupied by a 35-year old bookkeeper named Harry E. Clarry with 3 other members of his family.

1997

434 Gerrard Sreet East

Renovators: Trexcon Construction and Summit Restorations
Architect: Alan Tregebov

Reason for Award
This was the first award to a commercial property and was awarded to encourage the historically-sensitive renovation of large buildings. 

Historical Information
The Avion Hotel was originally built between 1890 and 1893 as a grocery store. It housed the Cruttenden’s Pharmacy until 1935 when William Campbell and David Garrity opened the Avion Hotel on the site. The Avion was one of the hotels that opened after prohibition ended and teh cost of beer, at the time, was 10 cents for 10 ounces.

1998

35 Spruce Street

Renovator: Ed Zelma
Owner: Christopher Dew

Reason for Award
The CPA gave the Award to Christopher Dew for his meticulous work in restoring 35 Spruce to its original Georgian farmhouse style. This was a notable project in which the CPA worked closely with the developer of the new townhouse development behind 35 Spruce Street to preserve the feel and fabric of the historic house on the site.

Historical Information
Built between 1860 and 1867 for Charles B. Mackay, a clerk at the Customs House on Front Street, the house also belonged subsequently to the Dean of Trinity College Medical School.

The 1861 Assessment record for 35 Spruce Street reveals that Charles McKay’s “brick cottage” was the only structure on the south side of Spruce Street and valued at the fulsome sum of $60.  The still-vacant Trinity (Medical) College site just to the west was valued at $72.

1999

126 Spruce Street

Renovator: Gord Kurtenbach

Reason for Award
A painstakingly researched and carefully crafted Victorian Style porch was added to the house.

Historical Information
Built in 1885-86, the first owner and occupant was Thomas V. Johnston, a 39 year old tailor.

2000

531 Parliament Street

Renovators: Jimmy and Gus Petsis

Reason for Award
Only the second commercial building to receive a CPA Award, the Winchester Hotel was recognized for both exterior and interior renovations, including cleaning of the red brick facades and installing new ceilings in the bar rooms.

Historical Information
The Winchester Hotel was built in 1861and expanded in 1887.  According to City records, John McCaffrey established the Santa Claus Tavern as the first business at the southeast corner of Parliament and Winchester. It was later renamed the Lake View House and then taken over by tavern keeper John Ayre in 1876.  Ayre expanded it into one of Toronto’s finest hotels at the time and garnered lavish praise for its modern conveniences and stunning view of the lake.

2001

413 Wellesley Street East

Renovators: Jacek Krupa, Chin Lan Kwong
Architect : Monica Kuhn 

Reason for Award
This award was for the best architectural restoration in 2000 and highlighted the property because of its attention to the foundation and façade which were restored with historic bricks.

Historical Information
Built in 1885, the first owner was Thomas E. Moberley, a 36 year old Barrister with offices at 2 Toronto Street. He lived with his family of 6 people and 2 dogs in the property until 1918.

2002

328 Carlton Street

Renovators: Linda Hendren and George Crossman

Reason for Award 
This award is for an addition to the original house.  The new construction on the Bowman Street side closely mimics the shape and details of the original, to the extent that only close inspection reveals that it is not part of the original building.  This addition is discreet and respectful of the streetscape.

Historical Information
Built in 1888 by Davis Carlyle and his son David J. Carlyle, this home’s first owner was Philip Firerenbach

Honourable Mentions
388 Parliament Street (RePrint)
210 Seaton Street
156 Winchester Street

2003

422 Sackville Street

Renovator: Heather Angus
Weenan General Contracting Ltd.

Reason for Award
The house occupies the centre of an important row of bay-and-gable Victorians between Amelia and Salisbury. This work completes the restoration of the whole row.

Historical Information
Built in the 1890s by George C. Hall who lived at 384 Sumach, the house was owned and occupied by Ernest G. West, a drug wholesaler.  Two adults lived in the house.

Honourable Mention
The skillful design of a two-story coach house at the rear of 351 Berkeley Street renovated by Maurice Collado and Jennifer Sharp won an honorable mention for attention to detail and the flair displayed in the overall use of form and materials. Our recognition of this project reflects the CPA’s new interest in the rear lane “streetscape” as public space.

2004

2 Bowman Street

Renovators: Pat and Doris Gillick
Architect: Monica Kuhn

Reason for Award
2 Bowman Street had become unrestorable. The dedication to building a fine replacement home for the one that was originally on the site was remarkable. Most of the facade was carefully reproduced to replicate the original materials and scale. 

Historical Information
The original house, built in 1872 for Robert Frank, was demolished in September 2002 and rebuilt as a replica.

Honourable Mention
The restoration of adjoining houses at 21 and 23 Salisbury by neighbours Marcellina Mian and Sebastian Rousseaux.  The original historic fabric of the entryway was revealed and details were replaced and, where necessary, replicated.

2005

270 Gerrard Street East 

Renovator: The Yonge Street Mission

Reason for Award
This award and the St. James Town runner up are not typical.  These buildings make a very positive contribution to the streetscape in areas of Cabbagetown that were in need of strong street-related buildings.  These buildings: 
• are in scale with the street and fit the context well,
• serve important community needs,
• reinforce the pedestrian realm on their streets.

Honourable Mentions
66 Metcalfe Street, for a faithful restoration of a much obscured workers cottage, owned by Michael, Isilda, Emilie and Hanna Attridge.

The residents of St. James Town and The City of Toronto For the development of the Wellesley Community Centre at 495 Sherbourne Street.

2006

264 Carlton Street

Renovators: John and Steve Michelis 

Reason for Award
This building was given the award because it is an authentic restoration of a Cabbagetown Victorian home.  The quality of the design, materials and detailing bring back the home to its original intent.  Once again, we felt that it made an important contribution to the street in that it was a conversion of a home that had been made into a rooming house and this restoration brought it back to its original single-family use, scale and quality.

Historical Information
Both of these houses are variations on the Bay 'n Gables style that was so popular in Toronto in the 1880s and 1890s.

Honourable Mention
61 Winchester, owned by John Dolan.

2007

531 Parliament Street

Renovator: John Bernardo

Reason for Award
This is an important building within our community.  We felt that the renovation and restorations re-established this magnificent structure to much of its original quality.  The removal of cladding added over the years, the opening of original windows and the return of the corner to a lively use are all strong reasons for this award. The restoration was extensive in that the brick was replaced and repointed, the lintels and sills replaced where damaged and the character of the original building was restored as well.

Historical Information
The Winchester started life as the Lakeview hotel in the 1880s. The bar was a part of Cabbagetown's life until its recent restoration.  

2008

314 Wellesley Street East

Renovators: 

Reason for Award
This house was treated to a complete facadelift, which included brick restoration and recasting of the original terra cotta decorations that had been obscured and damaged by wear and years of paint.

Historical Information
Built in 1890, this is an outstanding example of grand Queen Anne (unusual in Cabbagetown). Unusually shaped window frames (no two windows are the same) were made by the original owner Thomas Harris, a stone-cutter.

2009

355-357 Wellesley Street East

Renovators: David Swain and Janet Brown

Reason for Award
Two houses in disastrous and fragile condition were combined into one with most of the facade’s architectural features preserved, using imported brick that replicated the original.

Historical Information
These two houses built in 1885 were in disastrously precarious condition requiring a total gut. They were combined into one. As many of the architectural features on the front as possible were saved and all of the alterations and additions were tied into the building.

2010

369 Wellesley Street East & 477 Sackville Street

Renovator: Christopher McCormack

Reason for Award
New windows replicate the long-vanished originals. The front has been rebuilt with restored detail and large plate-glass windows appropriate to the period and original commercial function of the building.

Historical Information
Built around 1890, until recently this was a corner variety store. The building, which sits at the corner of Wellesley and Sackville, has been divided into a semi, thus the two addresses.

Honourable Mention
138 Spruce Street for its carefully restored trim, windows and porch, owned by Susan Grant & Steven Thorpe.

2011

270 Carlton Street

Renovators: Janet Wicks and Lory Brouillette

Reason for Award

Meticulously restored grand Victorian

 

Historical Information

 

Honourable Mention

29 Sword Street

2012

7 Wellesley Cottages

Renovator: Christopher Dew

Reason for Award

This beautiful cottage was lovingly restored. 40% of the original 1887 structure, however derelict, was preserved: brick foundation, studs, joists and beams.  It involved reinforcing a 125-year old crumbling brick foundation. In addition, the original 2x4 joists and 16-inch wide pine boards are preserved within the restored walls. i.e., behind the stucco we see on the outside and the drywall on the interior.

Historical Information

This worker's cottage was built in the late 1880s. Being detached, it was likely built for a foreman or supervisor.

Honourable Mention

446-448 Wellesley Street East

2013

271-273 Carlton Street

Renovator: Don Area Co-operative Homes Inc. (DACHI)

Reason for Award

This house had been a eyesore for many years: the brick cladding was separating from the building structure, the painted brick surface was peeling, some windows were casements, etc. DACHI undertook to restore some of their buildings and this was the first one. The brick was replaced and they used the appropriate heritage palette. The new windows are doublehung sash and the porch is replicated as per the old photos. It is a very clean restoration and fits with its surrounding and is a great addition to the street.

Historical Information

This semi-detached house dates from the mid-1880s and was built as single-family home. It is now a divided up in units and is part of a residential cooperative.

Honourable Mention

418 Wellesley Streee East

2014

39 Spruce Street

Renovator:

Reason for Award

This Award celebrates the modern addition to a Victorian home. It represents a trend in Cabbagetown to infill behind existing homes. The addition is contemporary but it “fits” with the older home in front. The original home is retained at the street but the infill is quietly inserted behind. The connections between the two elements of the home are very successful in that there is actually a break between them and they are accessed by a bridge on the upper levels.

Historical Information

To come.

2015

377 Sackville Street

Renovators: James Davie and Mark Hendricks

Architect: Monica Kuhn

Reason for Award

Historical Information

 

 

 

2016

372 Berkeley Street

Renovators: 

Reason for Award

The award was given because of the respect that was paid to the detailing and the replacement, reuse and replication of those details. For example, the front facade was completely re-bricked using heritage style bricks and mortar as the old brick could not be saved, the detailing of the brick replicates the original style, dog-toothed courses of brick (under 2nd floor window) were employed to restore to original look, the keystone was preserved over the door, mansard slate roof (with dichromatic pattern) was installed to replace exisitng asphalt shingles, etc. 

Historical Information

This Second Empire beauty was built in 1883. The original brick had been painted several times over.

 

 

Award for Improved Facade

514-516 Parliament Street

Congrats to Kendall & Co. Interior Design + Decor and St. James Town Steak and Chops for beautifying the southwest corner of Parliament and Winchester streets.